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How To Socialize A Puppy

 

socialize a puppy Wagging Tails Pet Sitter Dog Walker Mobile Groomer Southington Cheshire CTHow to socialize a puppy…first, what is puppy socialization?

This article will explain to you what socialization is and how to put it into practice to ensure your dog has few, if any behavioral problems later in life and is able to interact well with dogs and other species.

The importance of socializing a puppy can never be over emphasized, but what exactly does that mean?

Socialization is the process whereby a puppy learns to recognize and interact with other individuals of its own species, with people of different ages, races and genders, and with other animals that she is likely to come into contact with, such as cats and horses. The dog will learn the skills necessary to communicate with and interpret the other animals’ intentions, thus avoiding unnecessary hostilities. The dog will also learn to cope with stress and will suffer less as an adult in stressful situations. When talking of socialization, we often include habituation, that is, getting a puppy used to different places, sights and sounds so that she becomes confident in new situations and gets used to as many different stimuli as possible.
 
There are certain periods in a puppy’s development that are more important than others. The most sensitive socialization period begins at around 3 weeks of age and begins to reduce by 12 weeks. Peak sensitivity to socialize a puppy is between 6 and 8 weeks of age. It is important to remember that many young dogs need continual social interaction to maintain their socialization, and failure to do so will mean that they regress or become fearful again. The 6-8 month period is another sensitive time to socialize a puppy. Owners and trainers can use this window to further habituate and german-shepherd-puppy-wagging-tails-pet-sitting-mobile-grooming-southington-cheshire-west-hartford-farmington-ctsocialize their puppy to different surroundings, people and animals.
 

And how does one socialize a puppy?

 
So, now we know why and when socialization should be carried out, we must look at how to undertake this. It is recommended that your puppy be introduced to new stimuli and other people and pets in a systematic and controlled way. Remember that these formative experiences will shape the behavior of your pet for the rest of her life, so the idea is that they should be pleasurable and fun. They may well also be challenging, but if done in the right way, the puppy will learn that there is no threat and that she is safe to explore and meet new friends and situations without being fearful. This ensures the best chance of her developing a sound temperament and capacity to cope in all circumstances.
 
Early socialization is, of course, in the hands of the breeder and if they are conscientious and responsible they will ensure that the puppies are handled frequently, as well being exposed to normal household stimuli such as the television, vacuum cleaner, washing machine, doorbell etc. Puppies who are raised in a quiet kennel or room will have trouble adapting to a normal family environment.
 
So once the puppy is at home with you, it is your job to continue carefully introducing her to different people, animals and stimuli. It is however important to introduce the puppy to new people, places, objects and situations only when you can completely control the experience. A frightening experience will be detrimental – avoid unfriendly dogs and adults and children who do not understand how to be kind and gentle with animals. Invite friends to your house soon after you bring your puppy home to teach her that guests are friendly and welcome in her new home. Give your friends treats to give to the puppy so she is rewarded. Introduce her to one or two other friendly, healthy, fully-vaccinated dogs  – she can join in with bigger groups once she has all her shots and has learned some dog social skills and has over-come any fear. Always be ready to intervene if your puppy is scared, threatened or being bullied by another dog.
 
Hiring a Professional Pet Sitter, Dog Walker will most certainly assist in ways to socialize your puppy. Keeping your puppy safe at home, where risk of disease or parasites is very low, is a preferred alternative to dog day care or kenneling. A Professional Pet Sitter will visit your home while you are at work or away for the day and socialize your puppy. Exercise, companionship, socialization, relief are all great services provided by a midday dog walk, or puppy potty training session from a local Professional Dog Walker.
 
When socializing your puppy, you must evaluate your lifestyle and environment and assess what situations are lacking. For instance, if you live in the country, take your puppy to town and gradually and carefully let her become accustomed to crowds of people, noise and traffic. If, however, you live in a town and these things are no problem, take your puppy to the countryside so she can see and smell farm animals and become accustomed to them too. Make sure your dog meets some cats who are dog-friendly. Don’t let her chase them as this will start a life-long habit that will be difficult to change. If your household has no children, introduce your puppy to some children who can regularly play gently with her. Always supervise them to ensure the children are gentle and that your dog is responding well and not becoming nervous or aggressive.
 
Remember always to protect your puppy’s health, before she is fully vaccinated. Don’t put her down on the ground where there may be dog urine or feces, and don’t let her interact with other dogs that may carry disease. You can still socialize your puppy by carrying her into different situations and taking her in the car, allowing her to see many different things in a safe environment and she will get used to trips in the car at the same time. Use treats and praise to reinforce good behavior. Do not comfort your puppy if she is fearful as this can be interpreted as praise for the wrong behavior. Simply change the situation (i.e. ask an approaching person to step back or pick up your puppy to get her out of a difficult situation) until she feels safe and secure once more.
 
All interaction with your puppy at this age involves consistently rewarding desirable behavior which will increase the likelihood the dog will repeat this behavior. It will also help to prevent the development of undesirable behavior.
Another helpful step would be to enroll in puppy socialization and training class. This provides a great opportunity for puppies to socialize with other dogs, for puppies to learn obedience training in a playful environment with plenty of distractions and also for owners to learn training and communication techniques.
 
Thank you for reading How To Socialize A Puppy. Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in CT offers over 23 years of pet care experience. Check out our other informative and helpful blog articles!
 
 

How To Keep Your Pet Safe In Cold Weather

Cold Weather Pet Safetyice storm and blizzard Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming

You’re probably already aware of the risks posed by warm weather and leaving pets in hot cars, but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ health?

Here are some tips to keep your pets safe during cold weather:
Winter wellness: Has your pet had his/her preventive care exam (wellness exam) yet?  Cold weather may worsen some medical conditions such as arthritis. Your pet should be examined by a veterinarian at least once a year, and it’s as good a time as any to get him/her checked out to make sure (s)he is ready and as healthy as possible for cold weather.
Know the limits:  Just like people, pets’ cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Be aware of your pet’s tolerance for cold weather, and adjust accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you both from weather-associated health risks. Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are still at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster because they have less protection, and short-legged pets may become cold faster because their bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with snow-covered ground. Pets with diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances (such as Cushing’s disease) may have a harder time regulating their body temperature, and may be more susceptible to problems from temperature extremes. The same goes for very young and very old pets. If you need help determining your pet’s temperature limits, consult your veterinarian.

Provide choices: Just like you, pets prefer comfortable sleeping places and may change their location based on their need for more or less warmth. Give them some safe options to allow them to vary their sleeping place to adjust to their needs.

Stay inside. Cats and dogs should be kept inside during cold weather. It’s a common belief that dogs and cats are resistant than people to cold weather because of their fur, but it’s untrue. Like people, cats and dogs are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia and should be kept inside. Longer-haired and thick-coated dog breeds, such as huskies and other dogs bred for colder climates, are more tolerant of cold weather; but no pet should be left outside for long periods of time in below-freezing weather.
Make some noise: A warm vehicle engine can be an appealing heat source for outdoor and feral cats, but it’s deadly. Check underneath your car, bang on the hood, and honk the horn before starting the engine to encourage feline hitchhikers to abandon their roost under the hood.
Check the paws: Check your dog’s paws frequently for signs of cold-weather injury or damage, such as cracked paw pads or bleeding. During a walk, a sudden lameness may be due to an injury or may be due to ice accumulation between his/her toes. You may be able to reduce the chance of iceball accumulation by clipping the hair between your dog’s toes.
Play dress-up: If your dog has a short coat or seems bothered by the cold weather, consider a sweater or dog coat. Have several on hand, so you can use a dry sweater or coat each time your dog goes outside. Wet sweaters or coats can actually make your dog colder. Some pet owners also use booties to protect their dog’s feet; if you choose to use them, make sure they fit properly.
Wipe down: During walks, your dog’s feet, legs and belly may pick up deicers, antifreeze, or other chemicals that could be toxic. When you get back inside, wipe down (or wash) your pet’s feet, legs and belly to remove these chemicals and reduce the risk that your dog will be poisoned after (s)he licks them off of his/her feet or fur. Consider using pet-safe deicers on your property to protect your pets and the others in your neighborhood.
Collar and chip: Many pets become lost in winter because snow and ice can hide recognizable scents that might normally help your pet find his/her way back home. Make sure your pet has a well-fitting collar with up-to-date identification and contact information. A microchip is a more permanent means of identification, but it’s critical that you keep the registration up to date.
Stay home: Hot cars are a known threat to pets, but cold cars also pose significant risk to your pet’s health. You’re already familiar with how a car can rapidly cool down in cold weather; it becomes like a refrigerator, and can rapidly chill your pet. Pets that are young, old, ill, or thin are particularly susceptible to cold environments and should never be left in cold cars. Limit car travel to only that which is necessary, and don’t leave your pet unattended in the vehicle.
Prevent poisoning: Clean up any antifreeze spills quickly, as even small amounts of antifreeze can be deadly. Make sure your pets don’t have access to medication bottles, household chemicals, potentially toxic foods such as onions, xylitol (a sugar substitute) and chocolate.
Protect family: Odds are your pet will be spending more time inside during the winter, so it’s a good time to make sure your house is properly pet-proofed. Use space heaters with caution around pets, because they can burn or they can be knocked over, potentially starting a fire. Check your furnace before the cold weather sets in to make sure it’s working efficiently, and install carbon monoxide detectors to keep your entire family safe from harm. If you have a pet bird, make sure its cage is away from drafts.
Avoid ice: When walking your dog, stay away from frozen ponds, lakes and other water. You don’t know if the ice will support your dog’s weight, and if your dog breaks through the ice it could be deadly. And if this happens and you instinctively try to save your dog, both of your lives could be in jeopardy.
Provide shelter: We don’t recommend keeping any pet outside for long periods of time, but if you are unable to keep your dog inside during cold weather, provide him/her with a warm, solid shelter against wind. Make sure that they have unlimited access to fresh, non-frozen water (by changing the water frequently or using a pet-safe, heated water bowl). The floor of the shelter should be off of the ground (to minimize heat loss into the ground) and the bedding should be thick, dry and changed regularly to provide a warm, dry environment. The door to the shelter should be positioned away from prevailing winds. Space heaters and heat lamps should be avoided because of the risk of burns or fire. Heated pet mats should also be used with caution because they are still capable of causing burns.
Recognize problems: If your pet is whining, shivering, seems anxious, slows down or stops moving, seems weak, or starts looking for warm places to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of hypothermia. Frostbite is harder to detect, and may not be fully recognized until a few days after the damage is done. If you suspect your pet has hypothermia or frostbite, consult your veterinarian immediately.
Be prepared: Cold weather also brings the risks of severe winter weather, blizzards and power outages. Prepare a disaster/emergency kit, and include your pet in your plans. Have enough food, water and medicine (including any prescription medications as well as heartworm and flea/tick preventives) on hand to get through at least 5 days.
Feed well: Keep your pet at a healthy weight throughout the winter. Some pet owners feel that a little extra weight gives their pet some extra protection from cold, but the health risks associated with that extra weight don’t make it worth doing. Watch your pet’s body condition and keep them in the healthy range. Outdoor pets will require more calories in the winter to generate enough body heat and energy to keep them warm – talk to your veterinarian about your pet’s nutritional needs during cold weather.
This article provided by the AVMA and shared by Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service LLC

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=socmed&utm_campaign=gen

How To Choose The Right Dog Crate For Your Puppy

Looking for a dog crate?fancy dog crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming in CT

So you are looking for a dog crate and you want the highest quality you can get for the best price. What options are available to you, and what are the pro’s and con’s of the various types of dog crate…
First, let’s look at the black epoxy coated crates. They look great when they are new, but they chip so easily and tend to look old after only a few uses. Let’s be honest, if you are spending good money then you will want real value for your money and not something that is going look used within a short period of time.
Second, let’s consider those plastic bases that some companies put in the crates. Plastic bases often crack, and split and dogs often chew them. So in reality, there is no advantage to a plastic base except for possibly saving the manufacturer a little money on material and labor costs.
Third, there is chrome for cages – they look great, at first and then you find they also chip and flake because chrome is just another coating. Be aware that the flaking chrome if ingested by a dog could make them sick. In fact you don’t really see many chrome ones around these days which is a good thing. So what are you left with?
greyhound in crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitter in Connecticut
Well you are left with galvanized crates. These are by far the best option, and the top quality galvanized crates have the following features:
• Galvanized for non-rust long lasting
• Polished finish
• Anti-tamper locks
• Very heavy gauge mesh frame
• Metal tray that can’t be chewed and wont split or crack
• Assembles in three moves
• Wont chip or flake
• Lasts for years
• Slide out tray
• Wholesale Prices
The major difference between types of galvanized dog crates is the gauge of the mesh used. If you opt for the beautiful dog crates that are now made to look like a piece of furniture in your home (and why wouldn’t they? since we have cribs for babies, and our dogs are like our children!) be sure that even though these look great, they are SAFE and DURABLE for your pet. The wire should be galvanized and the wood should be safely treated in case your pooch tries to ingest it.
 Puppy in crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitting Service Farmington CT
Dog Crates, dog cages, kennels, whatever you call them, offer an effective way to housebreak puppies, keep your pets safe either at home or away. Some crates now offer an innovative build and design that allows simple assembly and disassembly in seconds and are galvanized which prevents against rust and deterioration and is safe for your dog – this means they will look great for many years to come. When not in use, the cage/crate folds flat for easy transport and storage.
Finding a dog crate that fits your needs includes not only being aesthetically pleasing, built safe to last, and the correct SIZE for your pet. Your dog must be able to stand up, turn around in a circle, and lie down, stretched out inside of the cage, without his paws or toes fitting thru the bars. Keep this in mind when buying a new crate for your small puppy. What size will they be in a few months? A larger crate can and should be divided while your pup is small. It should be a space they can grow INTO and not OUT of.
Finally, a dog crate should not be used as a “time out” area for your dog. It should be a positive reinforcement for good behavior, a place where they can safely relax, a place for them to call their own, a place where they WANT to go into on their own!  So, when introducing your pup to a crate, be sure to put a treat or two, a favorite safe toy and an old tshirt that smells like you in it. Then their crate will surely be a place they WANT to be!

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in CT

is an award winning company of 22 years. We firmly believe that a dog crate can help to properly house train and keep your pup safe, healthy and happy. Feel free to contact us to discuss your pet’s care, dog walking, pet sitting, mobile grooming, cat sitting, puppy potty training, overnight sitting, housesitting, and so much more in over 35 towns in Connecticut.
 Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service

Your Dog’s Water

dog water bowl Wagging Tails pet sitter mobile groomer cheshire ctFor your dog’s good health and comfort your dog’s water supply is important.

A constant supply of fresh water is essential to your dog’s good health and comfort. Water is very important, representing and estimated 70 percent of the dog’s weight. Like man, a dog can go without food for a surprisingly long time, but if he is deprived of water, he can’t survive for more than a few days, or even hours, in a hot, dry environment.

A dog’s water consumption varies according to the climate to his activity, and to the composition of his meals. Heat and exercise dehydrate him quickly. He gets very thirsty in cars or any confined space. However, excessive thirst for not good reason should be reported to your vet, because it may be an early symptom of diabetes or kidney trouble.

One bowl of water per pet should be available at all times.

At home he should have a clean, full water bowl next to his food dish, another in his play area, and possibly a third one that is accessible at night. Away from home the problem is more difficult. A thirsty dog is attracted to water in the gutter, in stagnant pools and rain puddles. Clean rain water is fine, but hard to find. Do not allow your dog to drink from puddles, shared bowls, or watering stations at dog parks or facilities. Parasites and infections can spread thru shared water sources.

Caustic chemicals used to melt snow on streets and sidewalks, weed-killers and insecticides on lawns and golf courses contaminate most standing water and should be avoided. Try to train your dog to drink only from his own bowl or what you offer him. Try to keep a water-filled plastic container with you or in your car, especially if you plan on a lot of walking or running during hot weather.

Other liquids besides water that dogs can drink?

Milk is the only liquid, aside from water, that appeals to dogs and still agrees with them, (although it may cause loose stools). They are seldom tempted by other drinks and particularly dislike carbonated drinks. Milk is always another good source of protein but should not be used as a substitute for meat. Any flavored drink should be avoided, as it only tends to irritate the kidneys, causing frequent urination and dehydration.  Water, fresh water, and plenty of it, is necessary for your pet.

In summary, for their health and safety, clean, fresh, cold water should always be available to your pets! www.waggingtails.com (860) 621-7387 (Pets) Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service of 21 years in ConnecticutWagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service

Dog Training Using Positive Reinforcement And Rewards

husky tennis ball Wagging Tails Pet Sitting Mobile Grooming Farmington, Southington ConnecticutTraining your own dog CAN be a positive and fun experience for both of you!

Training dogs using positive reinforcement and reward training has long been recognized as both highly effective for the owner and a positive experience for the dog.  Positive reinforcement training is so important that it is the only method used to train dangerous animals like lions and tigers for work in circuses and in the movie and television industry.
Professional Pet Sitters, Dog Walkers and Mobile Groomers, such as the team at Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming in Connecticut, utilize Positive Reinforcement and Reward Dog Training each and every day, on each and every visit.
Proponents of positive reinforcement swear by the effectiveness of their techniques, and it is true that the vast majority of dogs respond well to these training methods.
One reason that positive reinforcement training is so effective is that is uses rewards to teach the dog what is expected of it.  When the dog performs the desired behavior, he is provided with a reward, most often in the form of a food treat, but it could be a scratch behind the ears, a rub under the chin or a pat on the head as well.  The important thing is that the dog is rewarded consistently for doing the right thing.

Reward Dog Training

Reward training has become increasingly popular in recent years, but chances are some sort of reward training between humans and dogs has been going on for hundreds if not thousands of years.
When understanding what makes reward training so effective, some knowledge of the history of humans and dogs is very helpful.  The earliest dogs were probably wolf pups that were tamed and used by early humans for protection from predators, as alarm systems and later for guarding and herding livestock.Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service
It is possible that the wolf pups that made the best companions were the most easily trained, or it is possible that these early dogs were orphaned or abandoned wolf pups.  Whatever their origin, there is little doubt today that the vast variety of dogs we see today have their origin in the humble wolf.
Wolf packs, like packs of wild dogs, operate on a strict pack hierarchy. Since wolf and dog packs hunt as a group, this type of hierarchy, and the cooperation it brings, is essential to the survival of the species.  Every dog in the pack knows his or her place in the pack, and except in the event of death or injury, the hierarchy, once established, rarely changes.
Every dog, therefore, is hard wired by nature to look to the pack leader for guidance.  The basis of all good dog training, including reward based training, is for the handler to set him or herself up as the pack leader.  The pack leader is more than just the dominant dog, or the one who tells all the subordinates what to do.  More importantly, the pack leader provides leadership and protection, and his or her leadership is vital to the success and survival of the pack.
It is important for the dog to see itself as part of a pack, to recognize the human as the leader of that pack, and to respect his or her authority.  Some dogs are much easier to dominate than others.  If you watch a group of puppies playing for a little while, you will quickly recognize the dominant and submissive personalities.
A dog with a more submissive personality will generally be easier to train using positive reinforcement, since he or she will not want to challenge the handler for leadership.  Even dominant dogs, however, respond very well to positive reinforcement.  There are, in fact, few dogs that do not respond well to positive reinforcement, also known as reward training.
Positive reinforcement is also the best way to retrain a dog that has behavior problems, especially one that has been abused in the past. Getting the respect and trust of an abused dog can be very difficult, and positive reinforcement is better than any other training method at creating this important bond.
No matter what type of dog you are working with, chances are it can be helped with positive reinforcement training methods. Based training methods on respect and trust, rather than on intimidation and fear, is the best way to get the most from any dog.
Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service is a Professional Pet Care Company of 21 years. Founded in CT in 1995, we’ve cared for thousands of pets over the years…a labor of love! www.waggingtails.com    mulitple dogs at home
 Wagging Tails Mobile Grooming in CT

Why Professional Pet Sitting Is A Better Choice Than A Kennel Or Dog Day Care

Here’s the #1 reason Professional Pet Sitting in your home, is a better choice than a Kennel or Dog Day Care

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in Connecticut is sharing this information with all CT pet parents as a courtesy.  Your pet’s health and safety has been our #1 priority for the 21 years that we have been caring for CT’s pets.  With the recent outbreak of a deadly canine infectious disease in a CT kennel, we offer this information, so that YOU, the loving pet parent know that you do have a choice in your pet’s care!

There are MANY reasons why hiring a Professional Pet Sitter and Dog Walker is a better alternative for your pet, than taking them to a dog day care, kennel, bed and barkfast, pet spa, etc. No matter what they call it, it’s NOT home.  For a complete list of reasons why you should consider a Professional Pet Sitter over a facility, visit Why Choose Us.

There’s no place like home for your pet, with a Wagging Tails Professional Pet Sitter and/or Mobile Groomer!

The #1 reason is…that there’s NO place like home. That there is no place as safe, secure for your pet, where your pet will remain healthy and happy, than your OWN home is the #1 reason! When your pet visits a pet care facility or dog park, of any kind, your pets are exposed to diseases, infections, fleas, ticks and other parasites that other pets carry.  (Not to mention the fights that break out amongst dogs, that could cause severe injuries to your own pet).  We are confident that your pet is safest, healthiest and HAPPIEST right in their own home, with a Wagging Tails Pet Sitter. Please continue reading the news from NBC CT below for more information about CT’s deadly outbreak of an infectious disease.  And, next time you have to go away, or plan a long day at work, contact us to care for your pets!  www.waggingtails.com

For more information you can also visit Pet Kennel vs. Pet Sitter: What’s Best For Your Pet?

The information below is from NBCConnecticut.comWagging Tails Mobile Grooming in CT

There has been a severe respiratory infection outbreak at a large kennel in Windsor, the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association announced.

One dog that presenting fever, pneumonia and epistaxis has already died at the , the CVMA said. Tests for the dog came up negative for canine influenza and other tests are pending.

The co-owner of Day Hill Kennels in Windsor confirmed with NBC Connecticut that it had been affected by some type of infection.

“Our first notice that there was a problem going on was a week ago essentially and we were notified customers of ours after they took their dogs home some of the dogs developed a cough,” Roger Ball, the co-owner, told NBC Connecticut.

Ball said the infection was in an isolated area of the kennel where there were 30 dogs. He noticed about a third of them developing symptoms of the respiratory infection.

To the CVMA’s knowledge, no other veterinary hospitals are treating cases and the incident seems to be isolated to the facility.

Dogs from the Windsor kennel are currently being treated at Pieper Memorial Veterinary Center in Middletown and New England Veterinary Center in Windsor, the association said.

welcome home mattA vet told NBC Connecticut tells dog owners that if they board their pet or keep them at a daycare, to be on the look out for symptoms.

The warning is keeping Fidelco, a guide dog foundation, said it will be keeping its dogs out of public areas amid the infectious outbreak.

Fidelco said symptoms of the infection include coughing, wheezing, running nose, weepy eye, blood in cough or stool.

NBC Connecticut reached out to the state Department of Agriculture:

“The CT Dept. of Agriculture is assisting in the investigation of an incidence of a canine respiratory illness at a commercial dog kennel in Windsor.

Dept. of Agriculture State Veterinarian Dr. Mary J. Lis is working with veterinarians at Day Hill Kennel, where one dog died and six others became ill.

A necropsy is being conducted on the deceased dog, and tests are being conducted on the others to identify the illness, and to determine its cause.

Lis said the illness appears to be isolated to the facility and the ill dogs have been given antibiotics, which has reduced symptoms of fever they were exhibiting.”

And the following info is from Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service LLC in Connecticut

Although this may be considered an isolated incident, please be aware that pets can contract these illnesses at dog parks, day cares, and any other facilities that pet’s share space. If your pet exhibits any signs of illness, please do not hesitate to contact your veterinarian or bring your pet to the nearest emergency veterinary center.

The next time you plan a vacation, staycation, work a long day, or need your pet cared for, contact us! www.waggingtails.com

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Serviceangies list 2015 award20th anni transparentbest of awards 2015

Wagging Tails Donates Vest To CT State Police K9

CONNECTICUT STATE POLICE K-9 ASHER TO RECEIVE BODY ARMORWagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming in CT

(Released by CT State Police, Middletown, CT, 2016)-

Connecticut State Police’s K-9 Asher will receive a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc.

The vest is sponsored by Wagging Tails Pet Sitting and Mobile Grooming of Southington, CT

and will be embroidered with the sentiment “Donated by Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming.” Delivery is expected within eight to ten weeks.  The donation is part of Wagging Tails 20th anniversary celebration. The award winning, Connecticut company offers several pet care services, including, Professional Pet Sitting, Dog WalkingMobile Grooming, House Sitting, and Pet Waste Removal.

K9 Asher has been assigned to Trooper First Class Jessica Colburn for two years and is currently working at Troop A in Southbury. CT State Police K9 Asher is a three-year-year-old German Shepard who is trained in all patrol functions including tracking, building searches, evidence recovery, apprehension, obstacles and obedience. K9 Asher is also a Human Remains Detection Dog on the Search and Rescue Team.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c (3) charity located in East Taunton, MA., whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The nonprofit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four -legged K9 partners. Through private and corporate donations, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc., has provided more than 1,700 protective vests in 49 states at a cost of more than $1.6 million. All vests are custom made in the USA by Armor Express in Central Lake, MI.

The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

The suggested donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $1,050. Each vest has an average weight of 4-5 pounds and has a value between $1,795 – $2,234 and a five-year warranty. There are an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718.angies list 2015 award

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Why Dog Grooming Is Very Important For Your Dog’s Health

The phrase “dog grooming” conjures up an image of expensive salons for pets. It’s true that most pets do not need fancy haircuts, expensive baths or oil treatments. But shunning away the idea of dog grooming is akin to handling your pet with shortsightedness. Your pet’s appearance is a mirror to its overall health and wellbeing. Lack of grooming may lead to major health problems. Dog groomers ensure that your dog not only looks good but feels good as well.

Professional Pet Groomers Suggest:shedding shepard

Professional dog groomers suggest basic grooming for eyes, ears, teeth, face, tummy, skin, feet and nails, and coat should be done regularly.

Appropriate eye care entails regular cleansing. Your dog’s eyes should be bright, lustrous and clean. You must ensure that there are no signs of redness or excessive discharge. There is likely to be periodic buildup in the dog’s eye, which must be wiped out with a clean, damp cloth. However, if the discharge is thick or mucous-like, you must consult a veterinarian.

Ear care is also an important aspect of dog grooming. Moisture and dirt buildup inside the pet’s ear is a breeding ground for bacteria. You should trim ear hair and wipe with a clean cloth, thereby ensuring that the ear is kept dry. Any buildup of wax in the ear must be treated immediately, lest an infection sets in. The veterinarian would typically employ a solution to dissolve the ear wax and then cleanse it using a cloth or Q-tip.

Dental hygiene is equally important for your dog as it is for you. Plaque and tartar buildup causes gum disease. It is a common misconception that a balanced diet can prevent gum diseases or other teeth related problems. Cleaning the teeth and gums is highly essential for proper dental care. Dog groomers clean a pet’s teeth and gums in order to prevent unnecessary plaque buildup.

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Dog groomers stress on brushing a dog’s coat on a weekly basis. A thick and matted coat encourages bacterial infection and other diseases of the skin, and hence it is all more necessary to keep your dog’s coat clean. Stroking with a soft brush gets rid of dead hair, dander and dirt.

As every dog groomer would suggest, trim your dog’s nails at least once a month. It is a misconception that long hair between the toes would keep your dog’s feet warm in winters. Instead it would collect dirt and grime, and may encourage infection. Therefore, keep the hair trimmed at all times. Consult with your Veterinarian and Professional Pet Groomer for breed specific clips, ailments and treatment suggestions.

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service comes to you in Connecticut! Award winning, state of the art, modern, fully equipped groom salon on wheels for dogs and cats too! Voted THE BEST in Central CT for 10 consecutive years!  www.waggingtails.com  (860) 621-7387 (Pets)wagging tails pet sitter in ct20th anni transparent

Keeping Your Pets Safe In Cold Weather

golden retriever puppy in snowYou’re probably already aware of the risks posed by warm weather and leaving pets in hot cars, but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ health?

Here are some tips to keeping your pets safe in cold weather

as offered by the experienced team of 20 years in Connecticut- Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming LLC

Winter wellness: Has your pet had his/her preventive care exam (wellness exam) yet? Cold weather may worsen some medical conditions such as arthritis. Your pet should be examined by a veterinarian at least once a year, and it’s as good a time as any to get him/her checked out to make sure (s)he is ready and as healthy as possible for cold weather.
dog on snow plowKnow the limits: Just like people, pets’ cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Be aware of your pet’s tolerance for cold weather, and adjust accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you both from weather-associated health risks. Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are still at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster because they have less protection, and short-legged pets may become cold faster because their bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with snow-covered ground. Pets with diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances (such as Cushing’s disease) may have a harder time regulating their body temperature, and may be more susceptible to problems from temperature extremes. The same goes for very young and very old pets. If you need help determining your pet’s temperature limits, consult your veterinarian.
Provide choices: Just like you, pets prefer comfortable sleeping places and may change their location based on their need for more or less warmth. Give them some safe options to allow them to vary their sleeping place to adjust to their needs.
dog shoveling snowStay inside. Cats and dogs should be kept inside during cold weather. It’s a common belief that dogs and cats are resistant than people to cold weather because of their fur, but it’s untrue. Like people, cats and dogs are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia and should be kept inside. Longer-haired and thick-coated dog breeds, such as huskies and other dogs bred for colder climates, are more tolerant of cold weather; but no pet should be left outside for long periods of time in below-freezing weather.

More winter pet care precautions:

Make some noise: A warm vehicle engine can be an appealing heat source for outdoor and feral cats, but it’s deadly. Check underneath your car, bang on the hood, and honk the horn before starting the engine to encourage feline hitchhikers to abandon their roost under the hood.

Check the paws: Check your dog’s paws frequently for signs of cold-weather injury or damage, such as cracked paw pads or bleeding. During a walk, a sudden lameness may be due to an injury or may be due to ice accumulation between his/her toes. You may be able to reduce the chance of iceball accumulation by clipping the hair between your dog’s toes.
Play dress-up: If your dog has a short coat or seems bothered by the cold weather, consider a sweater or dog coat. Have several on hand, so you can use a dry sweater or coat each time your dog goes outside. Wet sweaters or coats can actually make your dog colder. Some pet owners also use booties to protect their dog’s feet; if you choose to use them, make sure they fit properly.
Wipe down: During walks, your dog’s feet, legs and belly may pick up deicers, antifreeze, or other chemicals that could be toxic. When you get back inside, wipe down (or wash) your pet’s feet, legs and belly to remove these chemicals and reduce the risk that your dog will be poisoned after (s)he licks them off of his/her feet or fur. Consider using pet-safe deicers on your property to protect your pets and the others in your neighborhood.
Collar and chip: Many pets become lost in winter because snow and ice can hide recognizable scents that might normally help your pet find his/her way back home. Make sure your pet has a well-fitting collar with up-to-date identification and contact information. A microchip is a more permanent means of identification, but it’s critical that you keep the registration up to date.
Stay home: Hot cars are a known threat to pets, but cold cars also pose significant risk to your pet’s health. You’re already familiar with how a car can rapidly cool down in cold weather; it becomes like a refrigerator, and can rapidly chill your pet. Pets that are young, old, ill, or thin are particularly susceptible to cold environments and should never be left in cold cars. Limit car travel to only that which is necessary, and don’t leave your pet unattended in the vehicle.
Prevent poisoning: Clean up any antifreeze spills quickly, as even small amounts of antifreeze can be deadly. Make sure your pets don’t have access to medication bottles, household chemicals, potentially toxic foods such as onions, xylitol (a sugar substitute) and chocolate.
Protect family: Odds are your pet will be spending more time inside during the winter, so it’s a good time to make sure your house is properly pet-proofed. Use space heaters with caution around pets, because they can burn or they can be knocked over, potentially starting a fire. Check your furnace before the cold weather sets in to make sure it’s working efficiently, and install carbon monoxide detectors to keep your entire family safe from harm. If you have a pet bird, make sure its cage is away from drafts.
Avoid ice: When walking your dog, stay away from frozen ponds, lakes and other water. You don’t know if the ice will support your dog’s weight, and if your dog breaks through the ice it could be deadly. And if this happens and you instinctively try to save your dog, both of your lives could be in jeopardy.
Provide shelter: We don’t recommend keeping any pet outside for long periods of time, but if you are unable to keep your dog inside during cold weather, provide him/her with a warm, solid shelter against wind. Make sure that they have unlimited access to fresh, non-frozen water (by changing the water frequently or using a pet-safe, heated water bowl). The floor of the shelter should be off of the ground (to minimize heat loss into the ground) and the bedding should be thick, dry and changed regularly to provide a warm, dry environment. The door to the shelter should be positioned away from prevailing winds. Space heaters and heat lamps should be avoided because of the risk of burns or fire. Heated pet mats should also be used with caution because they are still capable of causing burns.
Recognize problems: If your pet is whining, shivering, seems anxious, slows down or stops moving, seems weak, or starts looking for warm places to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of hypothermia. Frostbite is harder to detect, and may not be fully recognized until a few days after the damage is done. If you suspect your pet has hypothermia or frostbite, consult your veterinarian immediately.
Be prepared: Cold weather also brings the risks of severe winter weather, blizzards and power outages. Prepare a disaster/emergency kit, and include your pet in your plans. Have enough food, water and medicine (including any prescription medications as well as heartworm and flea/tick preventives) on hand to get through at least 5 days.
Feed well: Keep your pet at a healthy weight throughout the winter. Some pet owners feel that a little extra weight gives their pet some extra protection from cold, but the health risks associated with that extra weight don’t make it worth doing. Watch your pet’s body condition and keep them in the healthy range. Outdoor pets will require more calories in the winter to generate enough body heat and energy to keep them warm – talk to your veterinarian about your pet’s nutritional needs during cold weather.

We hope you have learned from and enjoyed this info regarding keeping your pets safe in cold weather.

This article provided by the AVMA and shared by Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service LLC

Pet sitter, dog walker, mobile groomer in Connecticut

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Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Dog Walking Southington, Cheshire, Bristol, Wallingford

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Dog Walking in Southington, Cheshire, Bristol, Wallingford and over 35 towns in Connecticut!

Winter Storm Jonas can’t keep us away from your pet! We’ve been pet sitting for over 20 winters and each one brings us a new challenge that we’re ready to meet. For the safety and well being of your pet…they’ll be happy at home, surviving the storm, with a Wagging Tails Pet Sitter.

Always ready, always there!

Whatever Mother Nature brings our way, Wagging Tails Pet Sitters & Dog Walkers are ready to care for your pets!

Yes, we are pet sitting and dog walking in snow, sleet, rain! For over 20 years now, we’ve been Connecticut’s premier pet care, pet sitting, dog walking and mobile grooming service! We truly care for all pets!  If the governor closes the State roads, Wagging Tails Pet Sitters are prepared to venture out as soon as they are opened.  All clients are contacted and made aware of the local weather.

When they gotta go, we gotta be there! 🙂  If you see a pet left outside in poor weather conditions, please contact your local Animal Control Officer, Police Station or authorities. Be the voice for those that cant speak!!! Keep them inside where it is safe and warm.

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