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How To Socialize A Puppy

 

socialize a puppy Wagging Tails Pet Sitter Dog Walker Mobile Groomer Southington Cheshire CTHow to socialize a puppy…first, what is puppy socialization?

This article will explain to you what socialization is and how to put it into practice to ensure your dog has few, if any behavioral problems later in life and is able to interact well with dogs and other species.

The importance of socializing a puppy can never be over emphasized, but what exactly does that mean?

Socialization is the process whereby a puppy learns to recognize and interact with other individuals of its own species, with people of different ages, races and genders, and with other animals that she is likely to come into contact with, such as cats and horses. The dog will learn the skills necessary to communicate with and interpret the other animals’ intentions, thus avoiding unnecessary hostilities. The dog will also learn to cope with stress and will suffer less as an adult in stressful situations. When talking of socialization, we often include habituation, that is, getting a puppy used to different places, sights and sounds so that she becomes confident in new situations and gets used to as many different stimuli as possible.
 
There are certain periods in a puppy’s development that are more important than others. The most sensitive socialization period begins at around 3 weeks of age and begins to reduce by 12 weeks. Peak sensitivity to socialize a puppy is between 6 and 8 weeks of age. It is important to remember that many young dogs need continual social interaction to maintain their socialization, and failure to do so will mean that they regress or become fearful again. The 6-8 month period is another sensitive time to socialize a puppy. Owners and trainers can use this window to further habituate and german-shepherd-puppy-wagging-tails-pet-sitting-mobile-grooming-southington-cheshire-west-hartford-farmington-ctsocialize their puppy to different surroundings, people and animals.
 

And how does one socialize a puppy?

 
So, now we know why and when socialization should be carried out, we must look at how to undertake this. It is recommended that your puppy be introduced to new stimuli and other people and pets in a systematic and controlled way. Remember that these formative experiences will shape the behavior of your pet for the rest of her life, so the idea is that they should be pleasurable and fun. They may well also be challenging, but if done in the right way, the puppy will learn that there is no threat and that she is safe to explore and meet new friends and situations without being fearful. This ensures the best chance of her developing a sound temperament and capacity to cope in all circumstances.
 
Early socialization is, of course, in the hands of the breeder and if they are conscientious and responsible they will ensure that the puppies are handled frequently, as well being exposed to normal household stimuli such as the television, vacuum cleaner, washing machine, doorbell etc. Puppies who are raised in a quiet kennel or room will have trouble adapting to a normal family environment.
 
So once the puppy is at home with you, it is your job to continue carefully introducing her to different people, animals and stimuli. It is however important to introduce the puppy to new people, places, objects and situations only when you can completely control the experience. A frightening experience will be detrimental – avoid unfriendly dogs and adults and children who do not understand how to be kind and gentle with animals. Invite friends to your house soon after you bring your puppy home to teach her that guests are friendly and welcome in her new home. Give your friends treats to give to the puppy so she is rewarded. Introduce her to one or two other friendly, healthy, fully-vaccinated dogs  – she can join in with bigger groups once she has all her shots and has learned some dog social skills and has over-come any fear. Always be ready to intervene if your puppy is scared, threatened or being bullied by another dog.
 
Hiring a Professional Pet Sitter, Dog Walker will most certainly assist in ways to socialize your puppy. Keeping your puppy safe at home, where risk of disease or parasites is very low, is a preferred alternative to dog day care or kenneling. A Professional Pet Sitter will visit your home while you are at work or away for the day and socialize your puppy. Exercise, companionship, socialization, relief are all great services provided by a midday dog walk, or puppy potty training session from a local Professional Dog Walker.
 
When socializing your puppy, you must evaluate your lifestyle and environment and assess what situations are lacking. For instance, if you live in the country, take your puppy to town and gradually and carefully let her become accustomed to crowds of people, noise and traffic. If, however, you live in a town and these things are no problem, take your puppy to the countryside so she can see and smell farm animals and become accustomed to them too. Make sure your dog meets some cats who are dog-friendly. Don’t let her chase them as this will start a life-long habit that will be difficult to change. If your household has no children, introduce your puppy to some children who can regularly play gently with her. Always supervise them to ensure the children are gentle and that your dog is responding well and not becoming nervous or aggressive.
 
Remember always to protect your puppy’s health, before she is fully vaccinated. Don’t put her down on the ground where there may be dog urine or feces, and don’t let her interact with other dogs that may carry disease. You can still socialize your puppy by carrying her into different situations and taking her in the car, allowing her to see many different things in a safe environment and she will get used to trips in the car at the same time. Use treats and praise to reinforce good behavior. Do not comfort your puppy if she is fearful as this can be interpreted as praise for the wrong behavior. Simply change the situation (i.e. ask an approaching person to step back or pick up your puppy to get her out of a difficult situation) until she feels safe and secure once more.
 
All interaction with your puppy at this age involves consistently rewarding desirable behavior which will increase the likelihood the dog will repeat this behavior. It will also help to prevent the development of undesirable behavior.
Another helpful step would be to enroll in puppy socialization and training class. This provides a great opportunity for puppies to socialize with other dogs, for puppies to learn obedience training in a playful environment with plenty of distractions and also for owners to learn training and communication techniques.
 
Thank you for reading How To Socialize A Puppy. Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in CT offers over 23 years of pet care experience. Check out our other informative and helpful blog articles!
 
 

A Wagging Tail – What Is Your Dog Trying To Tell You?

Is a wagging tail a sign of joy?

What is your dog trying to tell you?pup

Is barking a form of language among dogs with precise significance, or just playful noise?

Dogs exchange information among themselves less by voice than by a wide range of facial expressions, body postures and gestures, as well as by various scents. Dogs, who bark at night, are probably working off excess energy or announcing their presence, and this is undoubtedly the only message conveyed to other dogs within ear shot.

When a dog goes to his owner and deliberately barks, it is simply meant to attract attention. You must try to guess his general behavior, rather than from the circumstances and his general behavior, rather than from the particular form or pitch of bark he makes. The howling or baying of hunting dogs is an instinctive hunting cry informing the pack that the dog is on a trail. Barking at strange noises is a warning as well as a threat display.
A lonely dog who howls may be sending out a gathering cry to other dogs nearby. Wild dogs on the other hand, never bark, they only howl. Could the barking of domesticated dogs be a form of communication more closely resembling speech? A pet dog that shares a close relationship with his owner and has been taught to understand many words obviously makes an effort, sometimes quite successfully, to give meaning to his own utterances.
A dog who wishes to assert his importance and boldness instinctively employs all of the effects that make him look bigger and more frightening, raising his back to increase his height and holding his head high in defiance.
A dog who wants to show submission does just the opposite, making himself look small by crouching down with his tail between his legs and his ears laid back flat.
A dog who wishes to assert his dominance will take a perpendicular position with his head over the other dog’s shoulders, while nudging or pushing, with his neck arched, head and tail raised and tense. The conventional play invitation is a posture with the forehead crouched, the hind quarters high, a wagging tail, bright eye and a little yap. A rigid stance with a steady gaze and a high, trembling tail is hostile. A high, steady tail signifies self confidence, and held low indicates inferiority, fatigue, ill health, or a bad mood.
Pawing at the neck is an expression of affection, nose-nudging is another invitation to play. Paw-giving is a conventional canine gesture with two possible meanings. When he gives his paw to his owner while avoiding eye contact he’s saying “Please forgive me” or when he wants attention, he is saying “I’m here, don’t forget me.” When he offers his paw to another dog, it’s a sign of submission.
An owner, who takes the trouble to observe his dog and pay him the courtesy of listening to him, can establish a simple two-way communications system with his pet. Canine messages are generally very elementary, as he asks much less of us than we do of him. “I’m hungry,” “I’m thirsty”, “I need to go out”, or “Come with me I think something is wrong” are among the messages he manages to convey very well considering his limited means. His most eloquent utterance is the emotional gurgle of barks that means to say “I’ve missed you!”
Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in Connecticut is a professional pet care company of 22 years, award winning, bonded, insured and looking forward to caring for your pet!

5 Tips To A Better Behaved Pet

Want to live a healthier lifestyle? roxy tongueGet a dog.

Studies show that pet ownership helps reduce stress, lowers blood pressure and fends off feelings of loneliness and depression.
While nothing can top the love and companionship of a dog, there are some unpleasant behaviors that just won’t do – from barking all night, to wetting the floor, to chewing on your shoes when you’re not looking.
If your dog is exhibiting this type of behavior, it may be acting out due to boredom, pent-up aggression or because of lack of training. With proper lifestyle adjustments and diligent training, you’ll be on your way to having a happy, well-behaved pet. The following tips will help your furry friend become more obedient:
* Spay or neuter. The Humane Society of the United States says that this common procedure can help your dog live longer, be healthier and have fewer behavior problems.
* Help your pet relax. Just like people, dogs can get anxious, agitated and stressed. That’s why some veterinarians suggest giving your dog a calming product, such as an all natural Calming Spray, to help relieve hyperactivity.
Made with natural ingredients, Pet Calming Sprays act quickly to relieve restlessness, fear, nervousness and aggression and helps antsy pets sleep through the night.Karen M. Wagging Tails Pet Sitter Southington CT
* Have a workout routine. Provide your canine companion with regularly scheduled walks twice a day. This will help your dog avoid boredom, which can lead to destructive behavior. Hire a Professional Pet Sitter and Professional Dog Walker such as Wagging Tails Pet Sitters in Connecticut, to visit your pet regularly and walk them, while you’re at work.
* Go to school. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, enrolling your dog in an obedience class will teach you how to control your dog’s behavior both safely and humanely. Your Wagging Tails Pet Sitter offers puppy potty training and regular reinforcement of any training techniques that you currently follow to assist in educating your dog on good behavior.
* Be patient. Though teaching your furry friend to be more obedient may take determination on your part, it’s worth it. After all, as man’s best friend, your dog will appreciate bonding with you during the process.

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service is celebrating 22 years in business in CT.  Contact us today for your pet’s care!

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service

Dog Care: 6 Easy Steps For A Terrific (And Safe) Romp In The Woods

Have a fun and safe romp in the woods this fall with your dog!running in fall leaves

Leaves are falling and paws are crunching in the parks….. In this beautiful autumn weather, a walk in the woods with your dogs can be exhilarating.
What a beautiful time of the year to get out with your canine companion and enjoy the crisp, cool air, frolic in the falling leaves and take in the visual splendor of nature.  A walk in the woods can be an exhilarating experience for you and your dog, especially if you’ll take a moment for some basic dog care preparations. Minimize surprises and emergencies by following these simple steps.
I don’t know about you, but I will drive hours to find a place where the dogs can run free in nature. We all love it and often spend the whole day in the Conneciticut hills together. I’ve developed a list of easy dog care to-do’s to ensure we have a great time and arrive and leave together safely.

I recommend the following items for your outdoor adventures and dog care:

1) Orange vests for you and your dog
This may sound like overkill, but I recently had an experience with my dogs that scared me. I was out in the woods with my dogs when I heard shots fired not far from me. I couldn’t see my dogs and terror ran through me. Immediately I realized we were not prepared for the hunters.  Bright colored vests would have helped the hunters know we were not deer, and please don’t shoot us.  Every year you hear the stories of accidental shootings. Don’t be the next casualty — don your orange vests!
2.  Current dog tags on collars
Keeping a collar and current dog tags on your dog helps others get him home if you get separated. One thing I have recently done is change the dog tags to read “I must be lost.  Please call Mom.  (xxx) xxx-xxxx”.  This gives all the pertinent information, yet doesn’t provide information for an easy abduction.  I don’t want someone to know my babies’ names, which might lead the dogs to believe the stranger is a friend.
3.  Foot and body check during and after the outing.
I check my dogs’ paws and body frequently to remove the debris from the fall season — gum balls, seeds, burrs, rocks, thorns, pine needles, and leaves can add up to irritation or lameness.
4.  Fresh water and a bowl
If I can help it, I don’t let my dogs drink standing water. I carry fresh water instead.  I have had to deal with stomach problems in the past from bacteria in standing water. Carrying your own water is a small thing, but doing it can prevent lots of pain and suffering, a vet bill, and a 10-day supply of antibiotics.
5.  Towels
I love towels, lots and lots of towels.  To me, dropping dirty towels in the washer is much easier and less smelly than detailing a car or working to get that horrible wet, dirty dog smell out of fabric and carpet in my truck.
6.  Whistle — long range
Lastly, I whistle-trained my dogs. If we do separate, a blow on the whistle has them running to me.  Chances are, they don’t like not being able to see me and will be happy to have me back in their sights.  I highly recommend the ACME whistle that sounds from 2-5 miles.  Get it on a lanyard and carry it with you.
These 6 simple steps can make your outdoor trip so much more enjoyable, for you and your dogs. And paying attention to the basics in dog care shows your dog just how much you love her.
Happy hiking!