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How To Choose The Right Dog Crate For Your Puppy

Looking for a dog crate?fancy dog crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming in CT

So you are looking for a dog crate and you want the highest quality you can get for the best price. What options are available to you, and what are the pro’s and con’s of the various types of dog crate…
First, let’s look at the black epoxy coated crates. They look great when they are new, but they chip so easily and tend to look old after only a few uses. Let’s be honest, if you are spending good money then you will want real value for your money and not something that is going look used within a short period of time.
Second, let’s consider those plastic bases that some companies put in the crates. Plastic bases often crack, and split and dogs often chew them. So in reality, there is no advantage to a plastic base except for possibly saving the manufacturer a little money on material and labor costs.
Third, there is chrome for cages – they look great, at first and then you find they also chip and flake because chrome is just another coating. Be aware that the flaking chrome if ingested by a dog could make them sick. In fact you don’t really see many chrome ones around these days which is a good thing. So what are you left with?
greyhound in crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitter in Connecticut
Well you are left with galvanized crates. These are by far the best option, and the top quality galvanized crates have the following features:
• Galvanized for non-rust long lasting
• Polished finish
• Anti-tamper locks
• Very heavy gauge mesh frame
• Metal tray that can’t be chewed and wont split or crack
• Assembles in three moves
• Wont chip or flake
• Lasts for years
• Slide out tray
• Wholesale Prices
The major difference between types of galvanized dog crates is the gauge of the mesh used. If you opt for the beautiful dog crates that are now made to look like a piece of furniture in your home (and why wouldn’t they? since we have cribs for babies, and our dogs are like our children!) be sure that even though these look great, they are SAFE and DURABLE for your pet. The wire should be galvanized and the wood should be safely treated in case your pooch tries to ingest it.
 Puppy in crate Wagging Tails Pet Sitting Service Farmington CT
Dog Crates, dog cages, kennels, whatever you call them, offer an effective way to housebreak puppies, keep your pets safe either at home or away. Some crates now offer an innovative build and design that allows simple assembly and disassembly in seconds and are galvanized which prevents against rust and deterioration and is safe for your dog – this means they will look great for many years to come. When not in use, the cage/crate folds flat for easy transport and storage.
Finding a dog crate that fits your needs includes not only being aesthetically pleasing, built safe to last, and the correct SIZE for your pet. Your dog must be able to stand up, turn around in a circle, and lie down, stretched out inside of the cage, without his paws or toes fitting thru the bars. Keep this in mind when buying a new crate for your small puppy. What size will they be in a few months? A larger crate can and should be divided while your pup is small. It should be a space they can grow INTO and not OUT of.
Finally, a dog crate should not be used as a “time out” area for your dog. It should be a positive reinforcement for good behavior, a place where they can safely relax, a place for them to call their own, a place where they WANT to go into on their own!  So, when introducing your pup to a crate, be sure to put a treat or two, a favorite safe toy and an old tshirt that smells like you in it. Then their crate will surely be a place they WANT to be!

Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in CT

is an award winning company of 22 years. We firmly believe that a dog crate can help to properly house train and keep your pup safe, healthy and happy. Feel free to contact us to discuss your pet’s care, dog walking, pet sitting, mobile grooming, cat sitting, puppy potty training, overnight sitting, housesitting, and so much more in over 35 towns in Connecticut.
 Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service

A Wagging Tail – What Is Your Dog Trying To Tell You?

Is a wagging tail a sign of joy?

What is your dog trying to tell you?pup

Is barking a form of language among dogs with precise significance, or just playful noise?

Dogs exchange information among themselves less by voice than by a wide range of facial expressions, body postures and gestures, as well as by various scents. Dogs, who bark at night, are probably working off excess energy or announcing their presence, and this is undoubtedly the only message conveyed to other dogs within ear shot.

When a dog goes to his owner and deliberately barks, it is simply meant to attract attention. You must try to guess his general behavior, rather than from the circumstances and his general behavior, rather than from the particular form or pitch of bark he makes. The howling or baying of hunting dogs is an instinctive hunting cry informing the pack that the dog is on a trail. Barking at strange noises is a warning as well as a threat display.
A lonely dog who howls may be sending out a gathering cry to other dogs nearby. Wild dogs on the other hand, never bark, they only howl. Could the barking of domesticated dogs be a form of communication more closely resembling speech? A pet dog that shares a close relationship with his owner and has been taught to understand many words obviously makes an effort, sometimes quite successfully, to give meaning to his own utterances.
A dog who wishes to assert his importance and boldness instinctively employs all of the effects that make him look bigger and more frightening, raising his back to increase his height and holding his head high in defiance.
A dog who wants to show submission does just the opposite, making himself look small by crouching down with his tail between his legs and his ears laid back flat.
A dog who wishes to assert his dominance will take a perpendicular position with his head over the other dog’s shoulders, while nudging or pushing, with his neck arched, head and tail raised and tense. The conventional play invitation is a posture with the forehead crouched, the hind quarters high, a wagging tail, bright eye and a little yap. A rigid stance with a steady gaze and a high, trembling tail is hostile. A high, steady tail signifies self confidence, and held low indicates inferiority, fatigue, ill health, or a bad mood.
Pawing at the neck is an expression of affection, nose-nudging is another invitation to play. Paw-giving is a conventional canine gesture with two possible meanings. When he gives his paw to his owner while avoiding eye contact he’s saying “Please forgive me” or when he wants attention, he is saying “I’m here, don’t forget me.” When he offers his paw to another dog, it’s a sign of submission.
An owner, who takes the trouble to observe his dog and pay him the courtesy of listening to him, can establish a simple two-way communications system with his pet. Canine messages are generally very elementary, as he asks much less of us than we do of him. “I’m hungry,” “I’m thirsty”, “I need to go out”, or “Come with me I think something is wrong” are among the messages he manages to convey very well considering his limited means. His most eloquent utterance is the emotional gurgle of barks that means to say “I’ve missed you!”
Wagging Tails Pet Sitting & Mobile Grooming Service in Connecticut is a professional pet care company of 22 years, award winning, bonded, insured and looking forward to caring for your pet!

Dog Care: 6 Easy Steps For A Terrific (And Safe) Romp In The Woods

Have a fun and safe romp in the woods this fall with your dog!running in fall leaves

Leaves are falling and paws are crunching in the parks….. In this beautiful autumn weather, a walk in the woods with your dogs can be exhilarating.
What a beautiful time of the year to get out with your canine companion and enjoy the crisp, cool air, frolic in the falling leaves and take in the visual splendor of nature.  A walk in the woods can be an exhilarating experience for you and your dog, especially if you’ll take a moment for some basic dog care preparations. Minimize surprises and emergencies by following these simple steps.
I don’t know about you, but I will drive hours to find a place where the dogs can run free in nature. We all love it and often spend the whole day in the Conneciticut hills together. I’ve developed a list of easy dog care to-do’s to ensure we have a great time and arrive and leave together safely.

I recommend the following items for your outdoor adventures and dog care:

1) Orange vests for you and your dog
This may sound like overkill, but I recently had an experience with my dogs that scared me. I was out in the woods with my dogs when I heard shots fired not far from me. I couldn’t see my dogs and terror ran through me. Immediately I realized we were not prepared for the hunters.  Bright colored vests would have helped the hunters know we were not deer, and please don’t shoot us.  Every year you hear the stories of accidental shootings. Don’t be the next casualty — don your orange vests!
2.  Current dog tags on collars
Keeping a collar and current dog tags on your dog helps others get him home if you get separated. One thing I have recently done is change the dog tags to read “I must be lost.  Please call Mom.  (xxx) xxx-xxxx”.  This gives all the pertinent information, yet doesn’t provide information for an easy abduction.  I don’t want someone to know my babies’ names, which might lead the dogs to believe the stranger is a friend.
3.  Foot and body check during and after the outing.
I check my dogs’ paws and body frequently to remove the debris from the fall season — gum balls, seeds, burrs, rocks, thorns, pine needles, and leaves can add up to irritation or lameness.
4.  Fresh water and a bowl
If I can help it, I don’t let my dogs drink standing water. I carry fresh water instead.  I have had to deal with stomach problems in the past from bacteria in standing water. Carrying your own water is a small thing, but doing it can prevent lots of pain and suffering, a vet bill, and a 10-day supply of antibiotics.
5.  Towels
I love towels, lots and lots of towels.  To me, dropping dirty towels in the washer is much easier and less smelly than detailing a car or working to get that horrible wet, dirty dog smell out of fabric and carpet in my truck.
6.  Whistle — long range
Lastly, I whistle-trained my dogs. If we do separate, a blow on the whistle has them running to me.  Chances are, they don’t like not being able to see me and will be happy to have me back in their sights.  I highly recommend the ACME whistle that sounds from 2-5 miles.  Get it on a lanyard and carry it with you.
These 6 simple steps can make your outdoor trip so much more enjoyable, for you and your dogs. And paying attention to the basics in dog care shows your dog just how much you love her.
Happy hiking!